Time arguments

Many signals accept an argument which specify a date. Depending on the particular signal, we support a number of ways to specify such dates. We distinguish between absolute dates, which are defined according the standard calendar, and entity-relative dates, which are based on the fiscal calendar of any one company.

Some of the identifiers specify an ordinal number n, referring to the nth period of some kind. In these cases n = 1 refers to the “current” period (either the period we are currently in, or the first unreported period), n = 0 refers to the previous period, and n = 2, 3, … refer to future periods. In all cases it is required that n ≥ 0.

Note

Not all time arguments are accepted whenever a signal accepts a time argument. Consult the documentation for any individual signal to see which kinds of values it accepts.

Absolute dates

Dates based on the standard calendar.

Identifier

Example

Description

yyyy-mm-dd

2024-06-30

A specific date.

CYn

CY0

The last date of the nth calendar year.
(31 December)
The year we are currently in, is the 1st year.

CQn

CQ1

The last date of the nth calendar quarter.
(31 March, 30 June, 30 September or 31 December)
The quarter we are currently in, is the 1st quarter.

CSn

CS2

The last date of the nth calendar semi-annual.
(30 June or 31 December)
The semi-annual we are currently in, is the 1st semi-annual.

Entity-relative dates

Dates that depends on the evaluation entity, and are specified in terms of fiscal periods, that is, either fiscal years, quarters or semi-annuals.

If the evaluation entity is a company, the fiscal calendar of that company is used. If the signal is evaluated for another entity type (e.g. merchant, app), we look for the company that owns the entity (via ownership relationships), and if found, use that company’s fiscal calendar.

Many companies have fiscal years that deviate from the calendar years in some way. In these cases, fiscal years will necessarily overlap with two calendar years, which raises the question of what the fiscal year should be called. In our platform, we name fiscal years according to the calendar year in which the fiscal year ends, so FY-2025 refers to the fiscal years that ends in 2025, even though most of that year may have taken place in 2024. There is one exception to this rule: Some companies have fiscal years that end, say, on the Sunday that is closest to 31 December. In these cases, the years are named after the year which 31 December belongs to, even though the Sunday closest to it may be in the beginning of January in the following calendar year.

Identifier

Example

Description

FY-yyyy

FY-2024

The fiscal year yyyy.

nQ-yyyy

1Q-2025

The nth quarter of the fiscal year yyyy. (1 ≤ n ≤ 4)

nH-yyyy

2H-2025

The nth semi-annual period of the fiscal year yyyy. (1 ≤ n ≤ 2)

FYn

FY0

The nth fiscal year.
The fiscal year we are currently in, is the 1st year.

FQn

FQ1

The nth fiscal quarter.
The fiscal quarter we are currently in, is the 1st quarter.

FSn

FS2

The nth fiscal semi-annual period.
The fiscal semi-annual we are currently in, is the 1st semi-annual.

FQ/FSn

FQ/FS3

The same as FQn or FSn, depending on whether the company reports
quarterly or semi-annually.

RYn

RY0

The nth fiscal year.
The first unreported fiscal year, is the 1st year.

RQn

RQ1

The nth fiscal quarter.
The first unreported fiscal quarter, is the 1st quarter.

RSn

RS2

The nth fiscal semi-annual period.
The first unreported fiscal semi-annual, is the 1st semi-annual.

RQ/RSn

RQ/RS3

The same as RQn or RSn, depending on whether the company reports
quarterly or semi-annually.

Rolling fiscal periods

There are also some date specifications which do not refer to just one date or period, but which attach a fiscal period to every date in a time series. That is, while the entity-relative dates specified above determine a fiscal period relative to today’s date, these rolling dates determine a fiscal period relative to each of the dates in a time series.

If you use the identifier GXn (where X can be Y, Q or S), each date in the time series refers to the fiscal period which FXn would refer to at that date. The effect is that several FXn time series can be sewn together into a single GXn time series.

Identifier

Example

Description

GYn

GY0

Rolling relative fiscal years.

GQn

GQ1

Rolling relative fiscal quarters.

GSn

GS2

Rolling relative fiscal semi-annuals.

GQ/GSn

GQ/GS3

The same as GQn or GSn, depending on whether the company reports
quarterly or semi-annually.